In Brief
The Juno spacecraft has sent back some artistic looking photographs of the solar system's largest planet, Jupiter. The probe entered the planet's orbit in July and has sent back some truly amazing photographs.

NASA’s Juno spacecraft has been hard at work capturing truly stunning, fine-art caliber images from its orbit around our solar system’s largest planet, Jupiter. The probe entered the planet’s orbit last July and has been beaming back some incredible shots.

The images look like formless post-impressionist paintings. In fact, Scott Bolton of the Southwest Research Institute, the spacecraft’s principal investigator, stated that the photos “look like Van Gogh paintings.”

PHOTOGRAPH BY NASA/JPL-CALTECH/SWRI/MSSS/ROMAN TKACHENKO
Image Credit: NASA/JPL-CALTECH/SWRI/MSSS/ROMAN TKACHENKO

The clouds pictured above are a result of the planet’s unique atmospheric qualities, including remarkable chemical interactions, winds, and other phenomena. One of the more interesting features of the planet is that it is the fastest spinning planet in the solar system. It only requires 10 hours to complete a full rotation on its axis, compared to Earth’s 24-hour cycle.

PHOTOGRAPH BY NASA/JPL-CALTECH/SWRI/MSSS/SERGEY DUSHKIN
Image Credit: NASA/JPL-CALTECH/SWRI/MSSS/SERGEY DUSHKIN

Another fun fact about the planet is that it is one of the three brightest objects in the solar system. You can even spot it with the naked eye if you know where and when to look.

Image Credit: NASA/Damian Peach

One of the most visible features of the planet is its “Great Red Spot” which measures between 24,000 km (14913 miles) in diameter and 12 – 14,000 km (7,400 – 8,700 miles) in height. This is one of the areas in which researchers are hoping Juno will give them a better understanding.